Speaking up for progressive principles

I am running for Congress because we need more representatives who can bring the progressive point of view to the political conversation. I am convinced that Americans—even some who call themselves conservatives—value, support and live their lives according to the progressive principles of compassion and working for the common good. As a U.S. Congressman, I will speak up for those values and support programs that bring them to people’s everyday lives.
It’s your right as a voter to know my positions on the issues that affect you and our country.  As Election Day approaches, I will provide more details about my views. For now, I will share the basics of my positions on the issues listed below, and I will expand them as my campaign moves along closer to the election.

Jobs

I believe that every American who wants to work and is capable of working should be able to have a job. If that means restructuring our economy to bring back New Deal projects such as the Civilian Conservation Corps or a massive transportation project as we had in the 1950s, I’m in favor of it.  What’s key is to balance the equation between those wanting and capable of work with jobs available.  Read more

Schools

As former Missouri Senator Thomas Eagleton said, “The quality of a child’s education should not be an accident of geography.” When it comes to being a well-educated nation, our chain is only as strong as our weakest link. In many cases that weak link is in providing suitable funding for students from financially poor districts. We need to provide all school districts with the resources to educate their children. Read more

Health Care

I support Medicare-for-all, also known as a single-payer system. The United States is the only industrialized country in the world which does not provide affordable universal health care. We’ve come a lot closer in recent years with the Affordable Health Care Act (Obamacare) and I support its full implementation and hopefully in time it will be followed by a more efficient Medicare-type system. Read more

Civil Liberties

Our constitution, including its amendments, provides Americans with a wide range of civil liberties. However, these rights are only as strong as the laws that exist on the books as well as the strong enforcement of these laws. Through our country’s history, states have often failed to guarantee civil liberties. When states fail, the federal government must immediately step in. The ultimate protector of civil rights, voting rights, LGBT rights, or any other rights that ensure the well-being of our national community must rest with the federal government. Read more

Campaign Reform

Elections are far too long and far too expensive to allow a common citizen who does not have access to large sums of money to properly run for elective office. We cannot return to New England town meetings, but we can take all steps necessary to ensure that our democracy is played on a level field. Read more

America and the World

The United States has spent most of the 21st Century extricating itself in conflicts in which our brave men and women were sent to fight for no clear reason. It’s not easy for the United States to be the most powerful country in the world. We must continue to keep our military forces strong, but we also must recognize that being the biggest kid on the block does not mean that we always get our way. Barack Obama has done much to improve America’s stature above. He is constantly under pressure to repeat the actions of George W. Bush, even though they were mistakes. The United States must lead by example; be a strong and loyal friend; and be vigilant opponent of aggression around the world, whether it comes from nation states or cells of terrorists. Before taking military action, it is important to review the “just war theory.” Read more

Comments are closed, but trackbacks and pingbacks are open.